• Consideration 23 - Goat Milk is "low in essential fatty acids and other essential nutrients"

This is my dog, Chewy. She is a rescue dog. She is very oral. She will bump my hand with her teeth. It was -25 C when this photo was taken. Yes that is snow on her nose.

“Essential fatty acids in infant formula

The addition of the fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) to infant formula is not currently mandatory in Canada. However, they are permitted as an optional ingredient. Infant formulas with DHA and ARA have become widely available.

Infant formula is required to contain adequate amounts of the essential fatty acids linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3). These are the precursors of the long-chain, polyunsaturated fatty acids ARA (omega-6) and DHA (omega-3). Questions remain about an infant’s ability to convert linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids to their long chain derivatives (Hoffman et al., 2000). The DHA and ARA added to infant formula are sourced from algal and fungal oils which have been assessed for safety by Health Canada (Health Canada, 2003).

 However, evidence is inconclusive on the benefit of including DHA and ARA in formula for healthy term infants (Simmer, Patole, & Rao, 2011).” 

 https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/infant-feeding/nutrition-healthy-term-infants-recommendations-birth-six-months.html

 

“Parents and medical professionals observe reactions in babies fed with products containing Life’s DHA, the product name Martek gives its patented GMO version of naturally occurring fatty acids.”

http://www.naturalnews.com/034364_infant_formula_DHA_genetically_modified.html#ixzz3T3y2aljG

“2002: Food manufacturers begin supplementing infant formula and baby food with synthetic forms of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA). These polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, naturally present in breast milk, are important components of the human brain and eyes. Although the form of DHA/ARA used in infant formulas is structurally incompatible with the form found in human milk, food manufacturers market their products with the claim that their formulas will make babies more intelligent.”

 http://philosophers-stone.co.uk/wordpress/2011/12/dha-used-in-infant-formula-products-comes-from-genetically-modified-algae/

My GMO chat comes later. I lost the fight with my computer regarding the size of the lettering of the following text.

“Which fats should be in infant formula?

Human milk fat is made up of over 150 different types of fatty acids. While the mammary gland is able to synthesize many of these fatty acids, others must be supplied by fats in the mother’s diet. As human mothers are not consuming identical diets, it is not surprising that human milk fatty acid profiles vary widely among populations. The variation in the types of fat in human milk has long been a concern of nutritionists, pediatricians, and more recently, anthropologists. Of special interest is the amount of DHA (docosahexaeonic acid), an omega-3 fatty acid implicated in neurodevelopment. Breastfed infants receive a wide range of DHA (between 0.06% to 1.4% of total fatty acids)  and the concentration of DHA in formula is approximately 0.3% (based on milk from women consuming a Western diet).”

https://www.bing.com/search?q=Which+fats+should+be+in+infant+formula%3F&form=WNSGPH&qs=SW&cvid=08af6e9a514e412490d589dd6333f7a4&pq=Which+fats+should+be+in+infant+formula%3F&cc=CA&setlang=en-US&nclid=F3273882DD6BBFA045A3D223F9029496&ts=1522258494923&nclidts=1522258494&tsms=923

The fats in mammalian milks have evolved to produce better brains. Better brains and eyesight will have an enhanced ability to survive and reproduce.

“Infant formula supplementation with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids has no effect on Bayley developmental scores at 18 months of age–IPD meta-analysis of 4 large clinical trials.”

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Jan;50(1):79-84. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e3181acae7d.

If one looks at the fats that are on the ingredients list on infant formula container, and then look at the fats that are in goat milk, it is not hard to come to the conclusion, that goat milk fats are more similar to breastmilk than the fats in infant formulas. There are no clinical trials that show goat milk’s failure in the fat department. Do they want me to add DHA to goat milk?

“Which fats should be in infant formula?

Human milk fat is made up of over 150 different types of fatty acids. While the mammary gland is able to synthesize many of these fatty acids, others must be supplied by fats in the mother’s diet. As human mothers are not consuming identical diets, it is not surprising that human milk fatty acid profiles vary widely among populations. The variation in the types of fat in human milk has long been a concern of nutritionists, pediatricians, and more recently, anthropologists. Of special interest is the amount of DHA (docosahexaeonic acid), an omega-3 fatty acid implicated in neurodevelopment. Breastfed infants receive a wide range of DHA (between 0.06% to 1.4% of total fatty acids)  and the concentration of DHA in formula is approximately 0.3% (based on milk from women consuming a Western diet).”

https://www.bing.com/search?q=Which+fats+should+be+in+infant+formula%3F&form=WNSGPH&qs=SW&cvid=08af6e9a514e412490d589dd6333f7a4&pq=Which+fats+should+be+in+infant+formula%3F&cc=CA&setlang=en-US&nclid=F3273882DD6BBFA045A3D223F9029496&ts=1522258494923&nclidts=1522258494&tsms=923

The fats in mammalian milks have evolved to produce better brains. Better brains and eyesight will have an enhanced ability to survive and reproduce.

“Infant formula supplementation with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids has no effect on Bayley developmental scores at 18 months of age–IPD meta-analysis of 4 large clinical trials.”

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010 Jan;50(1):79-84. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e3181acae7d.

If one looks at the fats that are on the ingredients list on infant formula container, and then look at the fats that are in goat milk, it is not hard to come to the conclusion, that goat milk fats are more similar to breastmilk than the fats in infant formulas. There are no clinical trials that show goat milk’s failure in the fat department. Do they want me to add DHA to goat milk?